Think twice before you have those leftovers, USC Marshall study says

A recent study from the USC Marshall School of Business shows that saving bigger portions of leftovers might influence you to exercise less or eat more later.

According to Dr. Linda Hagen, who helped lead the study, the problem is actually about perception. “Leftovers from a meal can skew people’s idea about how much they ate,” she explains. “It’s difficult to judge how much we have eaten, so we’re often heavily influenced by external cues. For example, the larger portion of leftovers we see on the plate, the less we believe we ate. You might think, ‘After all, if there’s a lot left, I cannot possibly have eaten very much, right?’” She tells us that this becomes problematic in cases where it affects what happens next — like if that perception becomes a reason to eat more later on or an excuse to skip a planned workout because you feel you haven’t eaten very much.

Read the full article: How Bringing Home Leftovers Could Derail Your Health Goals (Brit + Co.)

 

October 19th, 2018|Categories: Client News|Tags: , , , , |

USC Marshall releases “Buying Beauty for the Long Run”

Scientists from USC Marshall conducted a study to see what kind of effect a gadget’s color had on its long-term likability. And the results? In short, don’t be scared; skip the black and silver and go with the hue or shade that really speaks to you.

In their experiment, Eva C. Buechel and Claudia Townsend separated products into two categories: high-arousal devices (like those with intense colors or complex patterns) and low-arousal products designed with less stimulating colors like beige, black, or silver. From there, they performed a series of tests that involved asking participants to evaluate each product on things like predicted likability or irritation, and then again after participants had gotten a chance to actually use each product over varying periods of time.

Read the full article: Stop Waffling and Get That Brightly Colored Gadget—Science Suggests You’ll Like It More (Gizmodo)

FanWide Wins $10,000 Sports Startup Competition At USC

FanWide, a startup which helps users find “viewing parties” for their favorite college or pro sports teams, anywhere they live or travel, has won a the $10,000 prize in the HYPE Sports Innovation competition, held last week at the University of Southern California. According to HYPE, the competition, held in conjunction with USC’s Marshall School of Business and Silicon Valley Bank, was aimed at finding the most disruptive technology likely to shape the future of basketball.

Read the full article: FanWide Wins $10,000 Sports Startup Competition At USC (socalTECH)

February 24th, 2018|Categories: Client News|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Reader’s Digest highlights USC Marshall study on easy way to stay fit

A USC Marshall study led by Dr. Linda Hagen shows that, in order to ease the process of staying fit, it’s best to serve yourself instead of having others serve for you. In Hagen’s research, which will be published in the Journal of Marketing Research later this year, the team found that when participants served their own unhealthy foods, they were more likely to either skip them altogether or take skimpy portions compared to when they grabbed pre-filled cups, pre-sliced cake, or pre-set sizes of frozen yogurt.

“Our research shows that for unhealthy—but not for healthy—food, consumers are more likely to indulge and have larger portions when they are less involved in serving the food, like when another person serves it for them or when it’s already pre-plated,” says study co-author Linda Hagen, assistant professor of marketing at the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California. “They’re less likely to indulge and will choose smaller portions when they have to serve themselves.”

Read the full article: Want to Eat Less Junk Food? This Science-Backed Trick Works Every Time (Reader’s Digest)

January 26th, 2017|Categories: Client News|Tags: , , , , , |